Welcome to Ryan Reynolds Fan! We aim to bring you the latest news, photos, and everything about Ryan. You may know Ryan from movies such as Van Wilder, Definitely, Maybe, The Proposal, Safe House, or Self/less. He will next reprise his role as Deadpool from X-Men Origins: Wolverine in a standalone film. Feel free to browse the site and enjoy your stay!
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24 July 2018 Posted by

Ryan Reynolds hopes the Deadpool universe can feature more LGBTQ characters, the actor said during a boisterous, free-wheeling Hall H panel at Comic-Con on Saturday. He’s even hoping that Deadpool and his alter-ego Wade Wilson, a self-described pansexual, will one day explore that side of his sexuality.

“I certainly think that this universe…needs to represent and reflect the world in very real ways,” Reynolds said when asked by a fan if future Deadpool movies will feature more gay or bi characters. “The great thing about Deadpool is that we’re allowed to do things that other superhero movies don’t necessarily do. It’s something that I’d love to see more of, certainly through Wade, certainly through this universe because it’s something that we’re building out more.”

Reynolds was responding to a query by a fan, who described herself as bisexual.

“Deadpool 2” boasted one gay character, Negasonic Teenage Warhead, who is depicted in the film as happily involved in a relationship with another woman. Brianna Hildebrand, who plays the role, said she had one demand for producers. She wanted to make sure that they depicted her same-sex relationship “the way it is and not be a big deal.”

Reynolds came to San Diego to hawk blu-rays of “Deadpool 2,” specifically an extended cut that features scenes of the Merc with a Mouth contemplating killing baby Hitler and urging Wolverine (a sweat-streaked Hugh Jackman) to team up with our spandexed hero at some point in the future.

“Deadpool” is a major movie franchise, having made over $1.5 billion worldwide, but before donning the tight-fitting red outfit, Reynolds had an unfortunate run in comic book films. “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” featured a much more straight-laced version of Deadpool, and “Green Lantern,” a big-budget DC film, flopped. Both were critically derided. Reynolds said that the two films were good experiences professionally, but acknowledged that “they are both pretty bad.”

On the bright side, however, he said, the films provided a “wellspring of awesome jokes” for the meta-humor that characterizes the Deadpool films.

“Deadpool,” a very R-rated take on the superhero genre, was a difficult proposition for Fox, the studio behind the film. It only got a greenlight because geek fandom demanded it.

The first film, Reynolds said, was made because of the people at Comic-Con. The second, he joked, was the result of “corporate greed and a splash of destiny.”

4 May 2018 Posted by

Ryan Reynolds may be the picture of confidence onscreen, but once the camera turns off the actor says he’s often a nervous wreck.

The actor, 41, opens up about his longtime battle with anxiety in a new interview with The New York Times.

“I have anxiety. I’ve always had anxiety,” he says. “Both in the lighthearted ‘I’m anxious about this’ kind of thing, and I’ve been to the depths of the darker end of the spectrum, which is not fun.”

During the early days of his career, Reynolds says he would often stay awake at night paralyzed by fear about his future.

Calling his early 20s a “real unhinged phase,” the actor admits he self-medicated to ease his anxiety.

“I was partying and just trying to make myself vanish in some way,” he says.

As his career began to take off, Reynolds toned down the partying but he says the anxiety never went away. To this day, he still gets wracked by dread and nausea before interviews and talk show appearances.

The actor is busy promoting the sequel to his highly successful 2016 film Deadpool. And with the upcoming film already breaking ticket presale records, the sequel is expected to be another hit — something that makes Reynolds a bit nervous.

“When there’s built-in expectation,” he says, “your brain always processes that as danger.”

So how does he cope with his anxiety? Reynolds, who is known for his quick wit, says he uses humor as a defense and coping mechanism.

“When the curtain opens, I turn on this knucklehead, and he kind of takes over and goes away again once I walk off set,” he explains. “That’s that great self-defense mechanism. I figure if you’re going to jump off a cliff, you might as well fly.”

Reynolds previously opened up about his battle with anxiety, revealing he had a mental breakdown after wrapping Deadpool.

“I went to go see a doctor because I felt like I was suffering from a neurological problem or something,” Reynolds told GQ. “And every doctor I saw said, ‘You have anxiety.’ ”

Deadpool 2 hits theaters May 18.

22 September 2015 Posted by

Ever wondered if your lack of artistic ability was due to your parents’ mathematical-minded genetics or their refusal to sign you up for after-school art classes? Or how your friend was a piano prodigy despite her dad barely being able to play a note?

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22 September 2015 Posted by

Some believe that hereditary factors are responsible for one family producing generations of musical virtuosos, while others suggest that our cultural and environmental surroundings play a larger role than genetics.

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22 September 2015 Posted by

The literature on creativity suggests that there are at least a few personality traits that promote creative behavior, such as openness, a willingness to take risks and an ability to tolerate ambiguity and cope with novel situations.

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22 September 2015 Posted by

They were both Chinese immigrants to America—my father was a mechanic and my mother took care of the family. They taught me to work hard, take opportunities, accept responsibility and eschew cowardice, less by explicit direction and more by implicit influenc

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22 September 2015 Posted by

A balanced composition feels right. It feels stable and aesthetically pleasing. While some of its elements might be focal points and attract your eye, no one area of the composition draws your eye so much that you can’t see the other areas.

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20 September 2015 Posted by

The person on the left makes the If one of the people was much bigger, though, the balance would be thrown off.seesaw rotate counterclockwise, and the person on the right makes it rotate clockwise by an equal amount. The force of each person acts in a different direction, and their sum is zero. Just as in the physical world, visual balance is a good thing. It’s desirable in and of itself.

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